Mothers Ruin | Creating a gin bar at home

Aaah gin. They call it ‘Mother’s Ruin’ don’t they?

In the 1700s it was considered a poor man’s drink as it was so cheap. To the extent that some workers were given gin in lieu of wages.

By 1743 the equivalent of 10 litres of gin per person, per year, was being drunk in England.

In fact, it was so widely consumed that there was an epidemic of drunk and disorderly behaviour in London. And the government imposed a tax — The Gin Act 1751 — to try to reduce the effects of it.

These days it’s a little more gentile.

Mostly.

Creating a gin bar at home

Did Someone Say Gin O’Clock?

‘Gin o’clock’ has become the by-word for relaxation. And with numerous artisan gin companies popping up all over the place — distilling small batches of the juniper infused spirit — gin is enjoying a heady revival.

I’ve said on many occasions that it’s my favourite tipple. It actually states ‘gin lover’ in my bio on my social media channels; and I think it would be fair to say that I love the stuff.

I created a little gin based cocktail last year — The Jubarb — and my boy and I have an ongoing competition to see who can outdo each other by bringing home the ‘best’ or most unusual gin.

We’ve had Dodd’s, Caorunn, Aviation. Plus one from Portugal that was DELICIOUS but I can’t remember the name of. To name just a few.

My favourite used to be Brecon, by the Penderyn Distillery. Although that’s recently been knocked off the top spot by Adnams Copper House Dry Gin; an explosion of ginny, florally, citrusy goodness with a gorgeous sweet finish.

(You’ll note the lack of an Adnams bottle in my photos — it doesn’t tend to last too long once it crosses the threshold of our home).

Creating a gin bar at home

Creating a gin bar at home

The Gin Bar

We’ve usually got a few bottles of ‘mothers ruin’ stashed in our drinks cupboard; but then some of the bottles are so pretty that it’s a real shame to hide them away.

Cue a mission to find a suitable table to create a little gin bar at home.

I found the perfect one at HomeSense — a bargainous £39.99 with fold away legs and a removable butler’s tray top.

I’ve seen cheaper alternatives but I loved the reverse dipped legs  and white/pale wood colourway. Plus if we’re ever out of gin — *snorts* — it doubles up nicely as a cute lamp table.

Creating a gin bar at home

Creating a gin bar at home

Creating a gin bar at home

So there we have it.

The perfect little display table for our gin collection and large enough to house all the other accoutrements needed to make a G&T.

Apart from it’s not *quite* big enough to accommodate a mini drinks fridge/freezer for the ice and tonic.

Ho-hum.

A girl can’t have everything, now, can she?

Creating a gin bar at home

Creating a gin bar at home

Creating a gin bar at home

This is a collaborative post but as ever all thoughts, words and images, as ever, are entirely my own.